Engine Stutter

Tonypil

Member
Well, the weather was nice earlier this week, so I took a break restoring and repairing past sins on the Dino and decided to ride it a bit. I was very impressed with the smoothness, the quick jump for the traffic lights and the handling of the bike. I took a ~200-mile ride with a buddy at cruising speeds of 45-65 MPH and noticed a distinct engine stutter when I rolled off the throttle to slow down. It happened almost every time. No warning lights or any other kind of problem. Filled up and got 51.2 MPG. so it doesn't seem to be a major problem. I put about 250 miles on it since I bought it and it now has 21,000 miles on the odometer. I haven't put the new plugs in yet or changed the oil, which looks pretty clean.
Has anyone else experienced this "stutter" and know the cause and how to fix it? Tony
 

Gizmo

Member
Site Suporter
Well, the weather was nice earlier this week, so I took a break restoring and repairing past sins on the Dino and decided to ride it a bit. I was very impressed with the smoothness, the quick jump for the traffic lights and the handling of the bike. I took a ~200-mile ride with a buddy at cruising speeds of 45-65 MPH and noticed a distinct engine stutter when I rolled off the throttle to slow down. It happened almost every time. No warning lights or any other kind of problem. Filled up and got 51.2 MPG. so it doesn't seem to be a major problem. I put about 250 miles on it since I bought it and it now has 21,000 miles on the odometer. I haven't put the new plugs in yet or changed the oil, which looks pretty clean.
Has anyone else experienced this "stutter" and know the cause and how to fix it? Tony
Does it happen around 50 mph when you are slowing down?? IF this is true .... PERFECTLY NORMAL!! ALL Dinos do this! (It's the tranny)
 


friesentom

New member
Hallo
.Das liegt am Katalysator der wird immer nach regeln bei 83-85 Kilometer
.diese teile kann man bei ebay kaufen dann schaltet man den Katalysator aus und er regelt nicht mehr nach
.
.
Schlechte Gasannahme bei der HONDA DN-01 700 2009 und Konstantfahrruckeln kommen sehr oft durch die Nachregelung der Lamdasonde im gemeinsamen Drehzahlbereich. Abhilfe schafft der Oxygensensor Eliminator, das dem Steuergerät einen eigenen Wert zurück gibt. Somit bleibt eine Nachreglung aus. Auch Ein anderer Auspuffanlage ohne vorgesehenen Anschluss Einer Sonde Kann verbaut Werden, ohne that Eine Fehlermeldung auftritt.Tuning zum kleinen Preis.Funktioniert Auch ohne EIN Powercommander.Bei Modelle Mit zwei Sonden Wird natürlich Auch two Ersatzstecker benötigtWird ein Power 16-010-0196 bei der HONDA DN-01 700 2009 verbaut, regelt die Lambdasonde ohne den Oxygensensor Eliminator nach und macht die richtigen Anweisungen unmörig.

Lieferumfang: Sauerstoffeliminator HONDA DN-01 700 2009 OXE05 NSA 700
 

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Tonypil

Member
Hallo
.Das liegt am Katalysator der wird immer nach regeln bei 83-85 Kilometer
.diese teile kann man bei ebay kaufen dann schaltet man den Katalysator aus und er regelt nicht mehr nach
.
.
Schlechte Gasannahme bei der HONDA DN-01 700 2009 und Konstantfahrruckeln kommen sehr oft durch die Nachregelung der Lamdasonde im gemeinsamen Drehzahlbereich. Abhilfe schafft der Oxygensensor Eliminator, das dem Steuergerät einen eigenen Wert zurück gibt. Somit bleibt eine Nachreglung aus. Auch Ein anderer Auspuffanlage ohne vorgesehenen Anschluss Einer Sonde Kann verbaut Werden, ohne that Eine Fehlermeldung auftritt.Tuning zum kleinen Preis.Funktioniert Auch ohne EIN Powercommander.Bei Modelle Mit zwei Sonden Wird natürlich Auch two Ersatzstecker benötigtWird ein Power 16-010-0196 bei der HONDA DN-01 700 2009 verbaut, regelt die Lambdasonde ohne den Oxygensensor Eliminator nach und macht die richtigen Anweisungen unmörig.

Lieferumfang: Sauerstoffeliminator HONDA DN-01 700 2009 OXE05 NSA 700
WOW! Lots of technical information here, unfortunately way over my head. I appreciate your help.
How do I determine if my DN-01 has one or two probes, and where are they located on the bike? Do I need to install the power device (06-010-0196A) in the bike and where does it attach?
I apologize for these dumb questions, but I am not a mechanic and need REALLY simple instructions.
Thanks for your help and interest in my question. Tony
 

friesentom

New member
WOW! Lots of technical information here, unfortunately way over my head. I appreciate your help.
How do I determine if my DN-01 has one or two probes, and where are they located on the bike? Do I need to install the power device (06-010-0196A) in the bike and where does it attach?
I apologize for these dumb questions, but I am not a mechanic and need REALLY simple instructions.
Thanks for your help and interest in my question. Tony
[/QUOTE
 

friesentom

New member
Hallo
Du brauchst nur das Teil auf dem Bild
Dann den Stecker von der Lambdasonde abnehmen und den Stecker vom Bild reinstecken dann hat dein Auspuff muffler aber keinen Katalysator mehr
 

Gizmo

Member
Site Suporter
Thanks, Gizmo. It DOES happen around that speed. Why does the trans do that?
Shifting from 6th gear to 5th .... strange, I know. I believe the sensor that they are talking about is the one on the Catalytic Converter (Oxygen sensor/ O2) that IF you remove the Converter, you have to 'lie' to the 'computer' of the Dino to make the bike 'still' run right. I THINK! Many people have 'tried' to 'improve' the performance of the Dino with VERY little success .... NOT cost effective. PERIOD!!
 
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foxdie

New member
Correct - an O2 eliminator will trick the Dino's ECU into thinking that an O2 sensor is present and reporting "correctly"...

That said, here is a warning; Using an O2 eliminator removes your ECU's ability to determine if there's a fueling problem (ie. running abnormally lean or rich) and take corrective action (adjust the fuel trim).
 

Tonypil

Member
I appreciate all of your input, fellow DINO riders. I wish that the bike ran and decelerated smoothly, like other bikes I have owned, I cannot slow down for a traffic stop without all the bucking and jerking, and without a clutch lever, all I can do to get a smooth slowdown is put it in Neutral every time I decelerate. I have ridden the 2018-2021 Gold Wings with the DCT automatic 7-speed transmissions and they are smooth both in acceleration and deceleration, and I'm not sure that my stuttering and jerking is an engine or transmission problem, but I am disappointed. I purchased this bike because at my age (77) the State of Illinois requires me to requalify all my driving licenses (truck/bus, car and motorcycle) and I thought that it would be more maneuverable for the DMV cone avoidance testing than my Gold Wing, but found that there's very little ability to control a low speed for these maneuvers. It's either nothing, or with a slight throttle, too much speed. With the 2002 Gold Wing's manual transmission slipper-clutch, I can use the clutch, throttle and rear brake to control a very low speed for those maneuvers. However, the Wing's long wheelbase makes it difficult for all but a very good show driver to do this on a big bike. Unfortunately for me, the DINO won't do it either.
 

Gizmo

Member
Site Suporter
Correct - an O2 eliminator will trick the Dino's ECU into thinking that an O2 sensor is present and reporting "correctly"...

That said, here is a warning; Using an O2 eliminator removes your ECU's ability to determine if there's a fueling problem (ie. running abnormally lean or rich) and take corrective action (adjust the fuel trim).
Thank you for that info .... I believe removing the O2 sensor has no real benefit to performance. A few have tried and reported not much improvement ... if any.
 

Gizmo

Member
Site Suporter
I appreciate all of your input, fellow DINO riders. I wish that the bike ran and decelerated smoothly, like other bikes I have owned, I cannot slow down for a traffic stop without all the bucking and jerking, and without a clutch lever, all I can do to get a smooth slowdown is put it in Neutral every time I decelerate. I have ridden the 2018-2021 Gold Wings with the DCT automatic 7-speed transmissions and they are smooth both in acceleration and deceleration, and I'm not sure that my stuttering and jerking is an engine or transmission problem, but I am disappointed. I purchased this bike because at my age (77) the State of Illinois requires me to requalify all my driving licenses (truck/bus, car and motorcycle) and I thought that it would be more maneuverable for the DMV cone avoidance testing than my Gold Wing, but found that there's very little ability to control a low speed for these maneuvers. It's either nothing, or with a slight throttle, too much speed. With the 2002 Gold Wing's manual transmission slipper-clutch, I can use the clutch, throttle and rear brake to control a very low speed for those maneuvers. However, the Wing's long wheelbase makes it difficult for all but a very good show driver to do this on a big bike. Unfortunately for me, the DINO won't do it either.
DCT is a TOTALLY different animal than the HFT. From your description of slowing down ... you HAVE a PROBLEM!! HFT does not do that IF it's working properly. At roughly 50 mph (de-accelerating), you will feel a 'bump' as it shifts from 6th to 5th but that's it! You need to investigate further into what the heck is going on (Honda dealership) IF you can find one that is at all familiar with the DN-01. Try using the 'manual' shifting method [shifting through the gears (6-5-4-3-2-1)] and report back to us what your findings are.
 
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Tonypil

Member
I will try to do that this week. I am having surgery on my right knee (thanks to the last MSF course I took =, which led me to buy the Dino and take my test at a DMV, and my right knee is painful, but if the weather isn't too bad, I'll give it a try this week and report back.
Regarding gears, you are aware of the fact that the DINO transmission really doesn't have discrete gears, it's more of a CVT (continuously variable transmission), so the manual mode only repositions the torque converter thing to produce a higher or lower gear ratio. That's why the RPMs increase to around 3000 RPM and stay there in D or S while your speed is increasing and you don't feel any gear-shifting, then when you get to the highest point the RPMs increase with the increasing MPH. In the manual mode, you can shift up and keep the bike in a higher gear and it will remain there until you slow down to the point where it thinks that it's too slow for the gear you selected and then automatically downshift. I like the DCT in the new bikes and hope that a dealer who knows what they're doing can fix this thing and make it run more smoothly. Tony
 

Gizmo

Member
Site Suporter
I will try to do that this week. I am having surgery on my right knee (thanks to the last MSF course I took =, which led me to buy the Dino and take my test at a DMV, and my right knee is painful, but if the weather isn't too bad, I'll give it a try this week and report back.
Regarding gears, you are aware of the fact that the DINO transmission really doesn't have discrete gears, it's more of a CVT (continuously variable transmission), so the manual mode only repositions the torque converter thing to produce a higher or lower gear ratio. That's why the RPMs increase to around 3000 RPM and stay there in D or S while your speed is increasing and you don't feel any gear-shifting, then when you get to the highest point the RPMs increase with the increasing MPH. In the manual mode, you can shift up and keep the bike in a higher gear and it will remain there until you slow down to the point where it thinks that it's too slow for the gear you selected and then automatically downshift. I like the DCT in the new bikes and hope that a dealer who knows what they're doing can fix this thing and make it run more smoothly. Tony
Just wanted some feedback on trying something ELSE with the Dino. (I have only had my DN01 for the last 10 years ... IF that tells you anything!) AND I run the shit out of it on the Interstate!
 

BobF

New member
In my opinion, one of the great things about HFT is how smooth it actually is when slowing down to a stop - absolutely no jerking, just the bare minimum of engine braking as the swash plate angle is automatically repositioned for the speed and engine revs. I find the when I'm slowing from a 60 to a 30 zone, and I've been using manual mode and it's in 6th, just snicking it into "D" when the speed has dropped to about 40 adds a tiny bit of extra engine braking so that 30 can be reached smoothly and comfortably without even using the brakes. "D" is definitely best for speeds below 40, and manual mode on the country roads with all the twisties.
 

Gizmo

Member
Site Suporter
In my opinion, one of the great things about HFT is how smooth it actually is when slowing down to a stop - absolutely no jerking, just the bare minimum of engine braking as the swash plate angle is automatically repositioned for the speed and engine revs. I find the when I'm slowing from a 60 to a 30 zone, and I've been using manual mode and it's in 6th, just snicking it into "D" when the speed has dropped to about 40 adds a tiny bit of extra engine braking so that 30 can be reached smoothly and comfortably without even using the brakes. "D" is definitely best for speeds below 40, and manual mode on the country roads with all the twisties.
I agree
 


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